The sign of the unicorn. A fabric shop for 18th century reenactors and historians.

18th and Early 19th Century Men's Sewing Patterns

We offer several companies' patterns. They generally come in various sizes.

Shirts | Breeches and Trousers | Coats, Jackets, and Regimentals

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Shirts

Larkin and Smith A Manual for the 18th Century Shirtmaker 1750s-1780s

Within each pattern is the new shirt book that covers in detail the 18th century man's shirt. Learn how to do the fine stitching and gathering that are the hallmarks of the 18th century shirt. This pattern will walk you through the construction of a shirt with techniques based on documented 18th century extant examples. Patterns for soldier's, gentlemen's and officer's shirt from 1750s-1780s are provided along with comprehensive step by step directions. Although full size pattern pieces are not given, directions for measuring the human body are given so a shirt made to fit an individual's shape can be excellently executed.

This booklet calls for 3 yards of fine linen shirting for a gentlemen's shirt. For soldiers, sailors and workman only 2 1/2 yards check linen shirting, 6.5 oz. or off white linen shirting, 5.5 oz. or commonly unbleached linen, 6.5 oz or for a warm winter shirt white, striped or checked wool flannel. One, two three thread shirt buttons may be used at the collar but most original shirts had two thread shirt buttons at the collar and removable sleeve buttons at the wrist band. For hand sewing the shirt use 60/2 linen thread to match.

If ruffles are being added it is important these are made of fabric finder than the shirt. Very fine 2.8 oz. linen will work or for an even finer look try Italian book muslin.

$22.00

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Larkin and Smith A Manual for the 18th Century Shirtmaker 1750s-1780s

Kannik's Korner Shirt 1750-1800

Man's pullover late colonial period shirt sewing pattern has shoulder reinforcement panels, neck and underarm gussets and can be made plain for the common man or fancy with chest and wrist ruffles for the gentleman. In The Providence Gazette of 1771, "RUN away . . .  an Englishman . . .  Had on . . .  a Check Shirt, with white Wristbands" cited in Taylor, Runaways, Deserters, and Notorious Villains From Rhode Island Newspapers Volume 1.

This pattern calls for between 3 1/4 to 3 3/4 yds. but we feel about 3 yards is enough for one medium sized shirt or 5 yards for two medium sized shirts. Shirts may be made of off white linen shirting, 5.5 oz.. Most common shirts of this time were made of unbleached linen, 6.5 oz or to hide stains check linen shirting, 6.5 oz. or for a warm winter shirt white, striped or checked wool flannel. One, two or even three thread shirt buttons may be used at the collar but most original shirts had two thread shirt buttons at the collar and removable sleeve buttons at the wrist band. For hand sewing the shirt use 35/2 linen thread or for finer shirts 60/2 linen thread to match.

For officer's and gentlemen's shirts try the very fine and tightly woven linen shirting, 5.75 oz. with very fine 2.8 oz. linen or Italian book muslin bosom ruffles.

Includes all sizes XS-XXXL

$14.00

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Kannik's Korner KK-4101 Man's Shirt 1750-1800 pattern for French and Indian, 1770s, and American Revolution historic reenactors and museum interpreters.
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Kannik's Korener Man's Shirt 1790 - 1830 KK 4102. Federalist, Lewis and Clark, Napoleonic, and War of 1812 reenactors and historic museum interpreters would use a shirt like this.

Kannik's Korner Shirt 1790-1830

Man's federalist period pullover shirt pattern with shoulder reinforcement panels, neck and underarm gussets, to be made plain for the common man or fancy with chest ruffles for the gentleman. This pattern will make a shirt that is identical to this extant shirt at the National Maritime Museum. In The Providence Gazette of 1795, "RAN AWAY . . .  an indented Servant . . .  had on, and carried with him . . .  2 striped blue and white [wool] Flannel Shirts, and 1 white Tow and Linen Shirt".

This pattern calls for between 3 1/4 to 3 3/4 yds. but we feel about 3 yards is enough for one shirt or 5 yards for two shirts. Shirts may be made of off white linen shirting, 5.5 oz.. For poorer impressions unbleached linen, 6.5 oz or for a warm winter shirt white wool flannel. One or two thread shirt buttons may be used at the collar with an additional thread shirt buttons on each wristband or many shirts had sleeve buttons at the wrist band. For hand sewing the shirt use 35/2 linen thread or finer 60/2 linen thread to match.

For officer's and gentlemen's shirts try the very fine and tightly woven linen shirting, 5.75 oz. with very fine 2.8 oz. linen or Italian book muslin bosom ruffles.

Includes all sizes XS-XXXL

$14.00

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La Fleur de Lyse 18th Century French Style Man's Shirt

This late colonial sewing pattern is very well documented and comes complete with clear illustrations and instructions to make thread buttons with options for ruffles on the sleeves and bosom slit. Also included are instructions and illustrations to make a French workman's cap and each of the three types of neck cloths no man should go without - stock, cravat and handkerchief. Fits all neck sizes 14 1/2" to 17 1/2".

This pattern calls for between 3 1/4 to 3 3/4 yds. but we feel about 3 yards is enough for one shirt or 5 yards for two shirts. Shirts may be made of off white linen shirting, 5.5 oz. but most common shirts were made of unbleached linen, 6.5 oz or for a warm winter shirt white or striped wool flannel. This pattern specifically calls for two thread shirt buttons at the collar and removable sleeve buttons at the wrist band. For hand sewing the shirt use 35/2 linen thread or finer 60/2 linen thread to match.

For officer's and gentlemen's shirts try the very fine and tightly woven linen shirting, 5.75 oz. with very fine 2.8 oz. linen or Italian book muslin bosom ruffles. This very fine 2.8 oz. linen is also what is used to make neck, handkerchiefs, cloths, and stocks.

$21.95

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La Fleur de Lyse 18th century French Style Man's Shirt  is probably the best pattern for nautical pirate shirts, mid 18th century, and French and Indian historic reenactors and museum interpreters.
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Kannik's Korner Man's Gaiters, Leggings or Spatterdashes For Infantry, Militia and Civilians c. 1790-1820.

Kannik's Korner Man's Gaiters or Spatterdashes

new New!

Four styles of mid calf length gaiters are included with variations on all so that one pattern can be used for both civilian and whatever a specific regiment dictates for their spatterdashes. Spats can be worn either over the trousers or under and are seen in many period prints. Historical notes and full documentation are provided for each style.

Includes - sizes adult S, M, L, 1X, 2X, 3X with fitting instructions

This pattern calls for 1 1/3 yd. of Russia sheeting. Notions include 18 5/8" black horn buttons, 35/2 unbleached, golden bleached or off white linen thread and 1 2/3 to 2 yards of 1" black cotton twill tape or 7/8" worsted twill tape for binding. Two straps 8 to 10" long that fit under the shoe will be needed. These can be made of 3/4" to 1" leather or 1" hemp webbing. Flat or satin latex based black paint can be used for blacking. After painting they can be polished using modern shoe polish. Historical blacking recipes can be used such as Preventing the Agony of Da-Feet. Oil based paint will also work but be careful since some will effect the canvas and take very long drying times. Tassels are an option.

$16.00

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Kannik's Korner Man's Accessories Common Items used by men of all Classes c. 1740-1830 pattern KK 4001 for mid to late 18th century and early 19th century, French and Indian war, American Revolution, Federalist, early republic, and Lewis and Clark era historic reenactors and museum interpreters.

Kannik's Korner Man's Accessories

A mid to late 18th century working man's mittens, cap, apron, neck stock, and balaclava. Suitable for 1740s to 1830s. In The Virginia Gazette of 1775, "RUN away . . .  a convict servant man . . .  He took with him . . .  a stock, and brass stock buckle".

$14.00

A buckle for your stock.

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Kannik's Korner
Men's (and Women's) Stockings, Women's Pockets, and Mitts

A full scale, multi-size, pattern for constructed stockings for men or women, with instructions for custom fitting. Can be made of knitted cloth, or of linen cut on the bias (good for 17th, 18th, early 19th century). Five pocket styles, including three mid-18th century (English, Scotch, & Italian), and two second half 18th century from America. Also includes a pattern for women's common linen mitts, cut on the bias (one size).

Includes stocking sizes S-M-L-XL-2X-3X Pattern

$14.00

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Kannik's Korner Stockings, Pockets, and Mitts KK 6001 works well for mid to late 18th century historic reenactor's and museum interpreter's clthoing.
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Country Wives Men's Caps 1813 to 1855 pattern for War of 1812 to 1830s and pre American Civil War historic reenactors and museum interpretrs.

Country Wives
Men's Caps 1813 to 1855

Full size patterns for several workmen's caps ranging in date from 1813 to 1850. The military cap was not regulation but they are seen in visual records. This pattern includes documentation, choice of fabrics, hints and illustrated directions.

This pattern calls for 1/2 yd. of 15-18 oz. wool broadcloth (navy blue seems to be the most common sometimes with a red band), sturdy linen such as 12.5 oz. Russia sheeting or indigo stripe. For hand sewing the cap use 35/2 unbleached linen thread and 1/4" black cotton twill tape to tie the back band. The bill will require a stiff leather brown or black piece about 1/8" to 3/16" thick.

$15.00

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Breeches and Trousers

JP Ryan Breeches

Men's late colonial sewing pattern for fall front breeches, with front pockets, optional waistband watch pocket and tabs for knee buckles. These breeches have a fit for the third quarter of the 18th century, with a short rise, fitting the torso lower in the front than in the back. In The Providence Gazette of 1772, "RAN away . . .  a bound Servant . . .  had on, and took with him . . .  Woollen Breeches of a grey Colour, mended some".

To make this pattern you will need about 2 yards of twill linen (ticken or Russia drill work well), tightly woven linen, or medium weight wool, 15 5/8" buttons or button molds, 35/2 or 50/3 linen thread, quilter's thread or buttonhole twist, 18th century breeches buckles, and one roll 1/4" cotton twill or 1/2 yard linen tape.

To fit waist sizes 30-32; 34-36; 38-40; 42-44; 46-48.

$18.00

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JP Ryan Breeches pattern for mid to late 18th century, French and Indian war, American Revolution, and early republic historic reenactors and museum interpretrs.
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Mill Farm Man's Breeches

Men's fall front breeches for the late colonial period have front pockets. This pattern has descriptions for optional waistband watch pocket, making the knee length breeches into trousers, a slight variation to make them military, and tabs for knee buckles. These breeches have a fit for 1770 to 1800, with a short rise, fitting the torso lower in the front than in the back. In The Providence Gazette of 1777, "Deserted from my Company of Artillery, in Col. Elliot's Regiment . . .  an Irishman . . .  Had on . . .  Sky blue Broadcloth Breeches."

To make this pattern you will need about 2 yards of twill linen (ticken or Russia drill work well), tightly woven linen, or medium weight wool, one yard light weight linen for a lining, 7 3/4" buttons or button molds, 10 5/8" buttons or button molds, 35/2 or 50/3 linen thread, quilter's thread or buttonhole twist, and one roll 1/4" cotton twill or 1/2 yard linen tape. Most extant breeches, runaway descriptions, and period artwork show buckles at the knee bands. For this option 18th century breeches buckles, will be required.

To fit waist sizes 28-30; 32-34; 36-38.

$10.00

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Mill Farm Man's Breeches pattern for late 18th century, American Revolution, and early republic historic reenactors and museum interpretrs.
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Kannik's Korner Man's Outer Breeches, slops or sailor's trousers pattern KK 4304 for mid to late 18th century and early 19th century nautical and pirate historic reenactors and museum interpreters.

Kannik's Korner Outer Breeches

Ideal for late colonial pirate clothing these men's outer breeches or 'slops' were commonly called sailor's trousers. These naval style trousers have a 1750 to 1820 fit, with a short rise, fitting the torso lower in the front than in the back.

To make these you will need between 1 5/8 to 2 3/4 yards of 12.5 oz. Russia sheeting, 6.5 or 9 oz. unbleached linen, indigo stripe, 14 oz. unbleached linen or similar heavy linen fabric, off white or unbleached 35/2 linen thread, one half yard of 1/4" cotton twill tape or 1/4" linen tape, and one or two 1" buttons or button molds.

Pattern for all waist sizes 32"-52"

$18.00

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Country Wives Men's Narrow Fall Trousers 1800-1825

The cut of men's trousers changed as rapidly as any garment in the late 18th and early 19th century. The front of men’s trousers in particular rose to meet the lower edge of the waistcoat. This pattern includes an angled fall front, a triangular shaping yoke below the back waistband the placement of suspender buttons and back eyelets. The trousers of the early 19th century fit with much less easing of earlier trousers and knee breeches. In The Providence Gazette of 1796, "RAN AWAY . . .  an Apprentice BOY . . .  19 Years of Age . . .  had on and carried with him . . .  two pair of Towcloth Trowsers".

To make these you will need about 2 1/8 yards of corduroy, 12.5 oz. Russia sheeting, 6.5 oz. unbleached linen, or medium weight wool. For a lining you will need 1/2 yard linen. Notions required are 35/2 or 50/3 linen thread in a natural or to match the fabric, 1 yard leather lace or cotton twill tape for gusset tie, 2 small 5/8" bone four hole buttons, 5 large 3/4" to 7/8" buttons or button molds and 6 flat suspender bone buttons (optional) 1/2" to 5/8".

If you are making pantaloons you will need 2/3 yards of 1" wide sturdy cotton twill tape for foot straps. For straigt leg foot straps you will need 1" leather pieces for food straps that are about 10" long and 2 small one inch flat buckles.

Sizes adult 34, 38, 42

$20.00

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Country Wives Men's Narrow Fall Trousers 1890-1825.
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Kannik's Korner Man's Trousers High-Waisted 1790-1810

This is the first good pattern for fall front straight trousers currently available and was worn by common working men and some gentlemen. The waist was rising at the end of the 18th century to just above the natural waist (above the hip bones). Included are directions for making closer fitted legs, variations in fall binders, optional watch pocket, directions for braces (suspenders), and fitting for those of us with bellies. In The Providence Gazette of 1796, "RAN AWAY . . .  an Apprentice BOY . . .  19 Years of Age . . .  had on and carried with him . . .  two pair of Towcloth Trowsers".

To make these you will need between 2 3/8 to 3 7/8 yards of 12.5 oz. Russia sheeting, 6.5 oz. unbleached linen, or wool. For a lining you will need 2/3 to 3/4 yards linen. Notions required are 35/2 or 50/3 linen thread in a natural or to match the fabric, 1/4" cotton twill tape, 5 3/4" button molds and 4 5/8" button molds.

To make braces 2 to 3 yards of heavy 1 1/4" cotton twill tape, 1/4 yard of 6.5 oz. unbleached linen, 4 3/4" or 7/8" buttons or button molds and 2 brass or iron suspender buckles.

Please specify size 28"-42" or 42"-52"

$18.00

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Kannik's Korner Man's Trousers High-Waisted 1790-1810 pattern KK 4303 for late 18th century, early republic and fedrilist historic reenactors and museum interpretrs.
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Laughing Moon Men's Narrow Fall Breeches c. 1790-1820 for early 19th century, Regency and Jane Austen era historic reenactors and museum interpreters.

Laughing Moon Men's Narrow Fall Breeches c. 1790-1820

This late style breeches pattern has a narrow fall front opening, with side frog pockets and watch pocket. They can be cut long, to reach to the calf, or short, ending just under the knee. The front fall closes with two buttons whereas the waistband closes in front with three buttons. Two more buttons are included to hold the side pockets closed. The front has two braces (suspender) buttons. The backs of the breeches have a very long rise and the tops are gathered into the back of the waistband. The center back has a gusset where fit may be adjusted and two buttons for the braces (suspenders). The breeches have leg openings that are faced and slightly turned to the front of the legs. These leg openings close with buttons and a tie, and are bound with a narrow band. The full leg lining is optional, but as constructed, the waistband, fall, leg openings, and gusset will still need to be lined. The breeches are interfaced wherever there are buttons or buttonholes. Breeches were worn for day or evening, formal or informal. In The Proceedings of the Old Bailey, London of 1802, in a theft trial a witness said "I had my watch in my breeches pocket, inside of my fob pocket".

To make these you will need between 1 3/8 to 2 3/4 yards of linen, heavy silk, cotton, worsted wool or woolen flannel, 35/2 linen thread to match fabric, 2 yards 3/8" cotton tape or 3/8" linen tape, and 9 3/4" a href="http://www.wmboothdraper.com/Buttons/buttons_main.htm#bmolds" onfocus="if(this.blur)this.blur()">buttons or button molds two 1/2" a href="http://www.wmboothdraper.com/Buttons/buttons_main.htm#bmolds" onfocus="if(this.blur)this.blur()">buttons or button molds and 8 3/8" a href="http://www.wmboothdraper.com/Buttons/buttons_main.htm#bmolds" onfocus="if(this.blur)this.blur()">buttons or button molds.

Pattern for all waist sizes 28"-56"

$18.00

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Coats, Jackets, and Regimentals

Kannik's Korner Man's Waistcoats Single-Breasted 1790-1815

This pattern includes a full scale patterns and directions for five views and either a single or double layer back.

For this waistcoat you will need just 1 yard of Russia drill or sheeting, stripe or sometimes check linen, worsted, wool flannel, or wool broadcloth. About 1/4 yard 60" wide linen buckram interfacing is needed. For a lining you will need 1 1/2 yards plus 1/4 yard for the pocket bag unbleached 3.7 oz. linen. Notions required are 35/2 or 50/3 linen thread in a natural or to match the fabric, quilter's thread or buttonhole twist to match, 1/4" cotton twill tape, between 6 to 14 5/8" button molds.

Pattern includes chest sizes 34" to 52"

$20.00

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Kannik's Korner Man's Waistocats Double Breasted worn by both common working men and fashionable men c. 1790 1815 pattern KK 4202 is a great very late 18th to early 19th century patternfor historic reenactors and museum interpreters. This is a good pattern for nautical impressions.
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JP Ryan Waistcoat pattern for mid to late 18th century, French and Indian war, American Revolution, and early republic historic reenactors and museum interpretrs.

JP Ryan Waistcoat

This late 1740s to early 1780s waistcoat may be made in long or short versions to fit the late colonial period you want and may be made with or without sleeves, with three different center front lines, depending on period and personal preference. In The Virginia Gazette of 1775, "RAN away . . .  two English convict servant men . . .  [one of them] born in Cambridgeshire . . .  had on a . . .  brown cloth jacket, with sleeves".

Fabric requirements vary greatly but generally are about 1 1/4 yard for the front (add a yard if you are adding sleeves. Either linen or wool may be used), 1 yard for the back (often waistcoats had a cheaper back fabric such as 6.5 oz. unbleached linen), 2 yards for a lining (again add a yard to line sleeves oatmeal handkerchief linen 3.7 oz. works well) and one yard linen buckram interfacing. Notions required are about 20 5/8 to 1" buttons or button molds (But all the civilian 18th to early 19th century waistcoats I have seen have small buttons around 1/2". I have seen several extant waistcoats with brass rings covered with linen. If you are using this pattern to make a sleeved jacket than larger buttons may be fine.) and 35/2 or 50/3 linen thread for hand sewing and one or two spools of quilter's thread or buttonhole twist.

Please specify chest size 40-48, with one size per pattern.

$18.00

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Kannik's Korner Double Breasted Short Jacket

This 1770 to 1800 workman's jacket with sleeves includes three sleeve style variations. This jacket works well for late colonial or early federalist period clothing.

Choose 2 3/8 yards of a twill linen, tightly woven linen, or wool for the body. You will need 2 3/8 yards for a lining such as oatmeal 3.7 oz. linen or for extra warmth wool flannel. You will also need about a 7/8 yard of 24" wide linen buckram interfacing. For notions one spool of 35/2 or 50/3 linen thread, one or two spools of quilter's thread or buttonhole twist, 8 to 10 yards of 1/4" linen tape, 16 7/8" button molds, and between 4 to 8 3/4" button molds for the sleeves will be needed.

Pattern includes sizes 38" to 50"

$20.00

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Kannik's Korner Double Breasted Short Jacket pattern KK 4551 is a great 1770s pattern and works well for American Revolution, and early republic historic reenactors and museum interpreters. This is a good pattern for nautical and late pirate impressions.
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Mill Farm Banyan and Cap pattern for mid to late 18th century, French and Indian war, American Revolution, and early republic historic reenactors and museum interpretrs.

Mill Farm Banyan and Cap

Banyans were worn at home by middling to gentry for much of the late colonial period as loungewear and even when greeting guests of lower status and sometimes out-doors from 1750 to 1800 and possibly later. Chest sizes 34 to 44 in one package.

Choose 4 yards of 60" wide or 5 yards of narrower fabric of a cotton print or heavy silk fabric, and an optional 4 yards oatmeal 3.7 oz. linen or light weight China silk for a lining and 1/2 yard of linen buckram interfacing. For notions 50/3 linen thread, and 6 7/8" buttons or button molds or 4 pair of frogs.

$18.00

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Mill Farm Greatcoat Pattern c. 1750-1800

Extra warmth for the gentleman is added with a choice of collars and capes providing variations appropriate for 1750 to 1800 in this greatcoat pattern.

To make this greatcoat you will need 5 yards of heavy weight wool, nine 1" buttons or button molds. 1/2 yard linen buckram interfacing, 35/2 or 50/3 linen thread and one to two spools of quilter's thread or buttonhole twist to match the fabric.

Available in one size only, up to size 44.

$18.00

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Mill Farm Greatcoat pattern for mid to late 18th century, French and Indian war, American Revolution, and early republic historic reenactors and museum interpretrs.
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JP Ryan 1750's Coat pattern for mid 18th century and French and Indian war historic reenactors and museum interpretrs.

JP Ryan 1750s Coat with Military Variations

Appropriate for either civilian or military wear, this coat has very full skirts, deep cuffs, a straighter front line and roomier sleeves than coats worn after the 1770s. The body of the coat fits close to the person with armholes set high and back to reinforce a correct, 18th century posture. Variations in lapels and cuffs are included to adapt to many regimental styles. Available in sizes 40 - 52, one size per pattern.

To make the 1750s coat you will need between 3 to 4 1/2 yards of 60" wide wool or 6 oz. or heavier linen plus 5/8 to 1 yard of optional contrasting material for cuffs and facings. A full lining will require the same amount as the outside of the coat in a fine linen, wool flannel or fine silk Persian. If the coat will be edged in wool or metallic lace between 12 to 15 yards for View A, 30 yards for View B and 21 yards for View C is required. View A and C uses 35 5/8" buttons or button molds whereas view B calls for 47 metal buttons. For the interfacing you will need 1 1/2 yard linen buckram. For most of the sewing one spool of 35/2 or 50/3 linen thread and at least two spools of quilter's thread or buttonhole twist to match the fabric.

$24.00

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JP Ryan Frock Coat

Gentleman's late colonial coat with collar, which can be made full length or short coat style appropriate for 1770 to 1780 in this fully illustrated, instructional, full size pattern.

To make this coat between 2 7/8 to 3 3/8 yards of wool broadcloth or twill linen and about the same amount for a lining of oatmeal 3.7 oz. linen or for extra warmth wool flannel is required. Notions needed are about 1 yard linen buckram interfacing, between 12 to 26 3/4 to 1" buttons or button molds, 4 1/2 to 3/4" 5/8 to 1" buttons or button molds, and 35/2 or 50/3 linen thread. Also for the button holes about two spools of quilter's thread or buttonhole twist will be enough. There is an option to bind the coat in 1/2" metallic lace or 1/2" wool tape.

Please specify chest size 40-48, with one size per pattern.

$18.00

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JP Ryan civilian Frock Coat pattern for Revolutionary War historic reenactors and museum interpreters.
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La Fleur de Lyse French Soldier's Small Clothes pattern for mid 18th century and French and Indian war historic reenactors and museum interpretrs.

French Soldier's Small Clothes
ca. 1750
Also good for civilians

NFM 1750 Pattern content:

  • Military Cap
  • Waistcoat
  • Breeches
  • Underpants

Included in this pattern are chest sizes 38-46 and waist sizes 30-38.
Research & development: Suzanne Gousse & François Gousse

$34.95

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Justicorps (Military Coat)
and Capot (Canadian Hooded Coat)

NFM 1755 Pattern content:

  • Coat
  • Hooded coat with large cuffs in two lengths

This pattern includes chest sizes 38-46. To see a good example of an early reproduction capot see the Deerfield Museum's exhibit.

Research & development: Suzanne Gousse & François Gousse

$34.95

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La Fleur de Lyse Justicorps, and Capot pattern for mid 18th century and French and Indian war historic reenactors and museum interpretrs.
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Men's Late Georgian Coat 1795-1810

new New!

View A is single breasted with only two buttons meant to be buttoned. There are only three seams in the entire coat body at center back and two at the side backs. The sleeves are attached at the natural shoulder and are somewhat long, with the cuffs extending to cover part of the hand. There are two pleats at the back where the tails are attached to the back. The back tails are not stitched to one another but instead overlap. The coat front is cut rather severely back from the waist, a style left over from when men wore swords and the bottom hangs to the knee. The coat is fully lined with silk lining in a matching or contrasting color. The upper center back lining is the only piece that is made of muslin. The collar is a very high standing collar with no fall. There are two tail pockets that are accessed from the outside of the coat, and there are pointed flaps that cover the access to the pockets. The sleeve has a simple cuff.

View B differs from View A at the front, cuff, pocket flap, and the collar. The front is double breasted with a falling lapel and the fronts are not cut away as far to the hem. The collar is also very high, has a stand and a fall. There is also a different tail pocket flap with a simpler design than View A. The bottom of the front of View B has two cutting options: One is cut squarely away from the front edge and the other has a rounded cut. The coat uses the same fabric to line the fronts as the outer fashion fabric. The sleeve cuff has a small overlap. The cuffs on the sleeves can be interchangeable and there is a third cuff option that can be used on either coat, call the Mariner's cuff. The back and the sleeves are the same for both Views.

To make View A between 2 7/8 to 3 1/4 yards of 60" wide silk taffeta or worsted wool and 2 to 3 yards of oatmeal 3.7 oz. linen or fine Persian silk for lining and pocket bags is required plus an additional one yard of oatmeal 3.7 oz. linen. Notions needed are at least 7/8 yard linen buckram interfacing, up to 23 very large (1 1/4 inch or larger) buttons or button molds (polychrome death head buttons were often used) are required. Finally Linen thread of either 50/3 or 35/2 to match the lining and outer fabric. For sewing the button holes you will need one or possibly two spools of quilter's thread or buttonhole twist that matches the outer fabric.

To make View B between 3 1/2 to 4 7/8 yards of 60" wide silk taffeta or worsted wool and 7/8 yards of oatmeal 3.7 oz. linen or fine Persian silk for lining and pocket bags is required. Notions needed are between 1 and 1 3/8 yard linen buckram interfacing, 14 3/4 inch buttons or button molds (polychrome death head buttons were often used) are required. Finally Linen thread of either 50/3 or 35/2 to match the lining and outer fabric. For sewing the button holes you will need one or possibly two spools of quilter's thread or buttonhole twist that matches the outer fabric.

$18.00

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Laughing Moon Men's Late Georgian Coat 1795-1810.
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Laughing Moon Men's Regency Tailcoat with Collar Notch and Lapel Options 1806-1820.

Men’s Regency Tailcoat with Collar Notch and Lapel Options 1806-1820

This Tailcoat has no waist seam, no lapel/front seam and is double breasted with the bottom 3 buttons meant to be buttoned. When buttoned the collar and lapels bow out to make room for shirt, cravat, and up to two waistcoats. The collar stands approximately 3 inches (7.6 cm) tall at the back of the neck when folded over. The front of the coat is broad and the back narrow forcing an erect stance forcing the shoulders back with a very close fit. The sleeves are very long so the sleeves with cuffs end at the knuckles of the hand as they should for this period coat. The sleeves fit very closely except at the top where they are puffed and full. There are two separate tails that overlap at center back. The coat has an inside breast pocket and there are two tail pockets. The side of the front has two pocket flaps that cover the opening of the tail pockets.

To make this coat between 3 1/2 to 4 1/2 yards of wool broadcloth and 1 1/4 to 2 yards of oatmeal 3.7 oz. linen or fine Persian silk to line the sleeves and pocket bags is required. Notions needed are 5/8 to 7/8 yard linen buckram interfacing, 18 5/8" or 3/4" and 6 3/8" or 1/2" buttons or button molds or flat buttons are required. Finally Linen thread of either 50/3 or 35/2 to match the lining and outer fabric. For sewing the button holes you will need one or possibly two spools of quilter's thread or buttonhole twist that matches the outer fabric.

$18.00

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Laughing Moon Men's Regency Tailcoat with Collar Notch and Lapel Options 1806-1820.

Men's Regency Tailcoat 1810-1830

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double breasted with the bottom two buttons meant to be buttoned. When buttoned the collar and lapels bow out to make room for shirt, cravat, and up to two vests. The collar stands approximately 3 inches tall at the back of the neck when folded over. The front of the coat is cut broad and the back narrow, forcing an erect stance or may even throw the shoulders back. The fit is very close. The sleeves are very long, meaning to end at the wrist or longer, with the cuffs adding another 3 inches so that the sleeves with cuffs end at the knuckles of the hand. The sleeves fit very closely except at the top where they are puffed and full. The shoulders are cut very narrow. There are two separate tails that overlap at center back. The coat has an inside breast pocket and there are two tail pockets. The back has two pocket flaps that are only decorative. View A can be made with any wool. Views B, D, D, and E have a collar and lapel that must be made with wool that does not ravel or ravels very little. View A lapel is a simple notched collar, which could be made with the upper collar of velvet if desired. View B is a small "M" notch. View C was called a "Lark's Tongue" notch and is very pointed. View D is a wide "M" notch. View E is a long touching "M" notch. The instructions have both period and modem (theatrical) tailoring instructions. Information about fabric, interfacing, lining, fit, and supplies sources are included inside the pattern.

To make this coat between 3 to 3 7/8 yards of 60" wide wool broadcloth and 1 to 1 1 1/4 yards of 60 inch wide oatmeal 3.7 oz. linen or 1 1/4 to 1 1/2 yards 45" wide fine Persian silk to line the sleeves and pocket bags is required. Notions needed are 5/8 to 3/4 yard, 45" wide linen buckram interfacing, 6 5/8" or 3/4" and 4 3/8" or 1/2" buttons or button molds. Finally Linen thread of either 50/3 or 35/2 to match the lining and outer fabric. For sewing the button holes you will need one or possibly two spools of quilter's thread or buttonhole twist that matches the outer fabric.

$18.00

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Past Patterns State Militia Regimental Coat: circa 1806-1815

This full size pattern is compiled from the 1809 American printing of the English Taylors' Instructor which included a section on uniforms the English addition did not and from many surviving coats both in public and private collections. Included is a discussion on variations to make the regimental unique to an area or to make it a musician or artillery coat.

To make this coat between 2 1/8 to 3 yards of blue wool broadcloth and 3/4 yard of red wool broadcloth for the facing and 3/4 yard of white wool broadcloth for the turnbacks. In addition, 3/4 yard white serge wool (or flannel) for a lining is required. Between 1 3/8 to 1 5/8 yard of 45" unbleached linen, 6.5 oz for sleeve linings, pockets and interfacing. However we would suggest trying linen buckram for the interfacing. Notions required are 28 German silver flat metal 3/4" buttons, 2 German silver flat metal 1/2" buttons, 8 large hooks and eyes, red, white and blue 35/2 linen thread to match broadcloth, and blue quilter's thread or buttonhole twist to match coat. Blue tailors' chalk and Blue tailors' chalk and bee's wax are also required.

This pattern is available in sizes 36-40, 42-48 and 50-56.

$30.00

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Past Patterns State Militia Regimental Coat ca. 1806-1815.
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Past Patterns 1804 U.S. Army Issue Artillery Coat for early 19th century hisotric reenactors and museum interpreters.Past Patterns 1804 U.S. Army Issue Artillery Coat for early 19th century hisotric reenactors and museum interpreters.

Past Patterns 1804 U.S. Army Issue Artillery Coat

This shell pattern may be used for military patterns circa 1796-1809 or Lewis and Clark. The pattern is based on U.S. Army correspondence between 1803-1805 from the National Archives as well as garments and drafting systems.

The pattern contains historical notes by Robert G. Stone describing the 1804 artillery coat as well as how to adapt the pattern for use in making a Lewis and Clark private's coat.

The pattern also contains illustrated instructions for hand stitches that are typical of early 19th century tailoring. Saundra Ros Altman has written and illustrated the sewing and fitting instructions.

To make this coat between 2 to 3 1/8 yards of wool broadcloth and 1/4 yard of wool broadcloth for the facing. In addition, 1 yard serge wool (flannel is the closest we currently carry) for a lining, 35/2 linen thread, quilter's thread or buttonhole twist, and 1/4" cotton or linen tape for securing buttons.

This pattern is available in army issue sizes 1 [35], 2 [37] and 3 [39] and modern sizes 4 [41], 5 [43], 6 [45], 7 [47], 8 [49], 9 [50], 10 [52], 11 [54], and 12 [56]. Of 54 inch wool cloth: Sizes 1 through 3 require 2 yds.; 4 through 6 require 2-1/4 yds.; 7 and 8 require 2-3/4 yds.; 9 through 12 require 3-1/8 yds.

$30.00

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Past Patterns Napoleonic Era British Foot Soldier's Jacket circa 1806-1820

This pattern is drafted. That means that it was created using early 19th century pattern drafting systems, the specifications from the British military archives and original issue uniforms. It has the small back and deep set sleeves typical of British military uniforms for the years 1806 to 1820.

The pattern contains templates for placing the looping on the jacket left and right sides, the cuffs, and wings. In addition to construction instructions the Sewing Guide contains instructions for Hand Stitches and How to Create the Five looping shapes. Saundra Ros Altman has written and illustrated the sewing and fitting instructions. James Kochan and Henry Cooke IV edited the text and Looping Shapes section.

To make this coat between 1 2/3 to 2 yards of wool broadcloth and 1/4 yard of wool broadcloth for the facing. In addition, 1 yard serge wool (flannel is the closest we currently carry) for a lining and 3/8 yard unbleached linen, 6.5 oz for pocketing. Notions required are 18 large buttons, 35/2 linen thread, quilter's thread or buttonhole twist, 1/2" wide worsted twill tape of about 12 yards for enlisted soldiers and 28 to 32 yards for musician's coats, and 1/4" cotton or linen tape for securing buttons.

This pattern is available in army issue sizes 1 [36], 2 [38], 3 [40], 4[42] and modern sizes 5 [44], 6 [46]. Of 54 inch wool cloth the jacket: Sizes 1 and 2 require 1-2/3 yds.; 3 requires 1-3/4 yds.; 4 and 5 require 1-7/8 yds.; 6 requires 2 yds.

$33.00

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Past Patterns Napoleonic Era British Foot Soldier's Jacket circa 1806-1820 for early 19th century hisotric reenactors and museum interpreters.
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Past Patterns U.S. Army Roundabout Matching 1812 Specs jacket early 19th century hisotric reenactors and museum interpreters.

Past Patterns U.S. Army Roundabout Matching 1812 Specs

The pattern matches the measurements of the U.S. Army correspondence of 1812 describing the size No. 2 of the Linen Jacket with Sleeves. The sizes No. 1, No. 3, and No. 4 are extrapolated from the No. 2.

These roundabouts were made of mixed gray kersey, Russia sheeting or cotton drilling. To make this jacket of wool between 1 5/8 to 1 7/8 yards of mixed gray kersey is required. Notions required are 11 reproduction foliated script I buttons , 35/2 off white or unbleached linen thread as well as quilter's thread or buttonhole twist for the button holes, and 1/4" cotton or linen tape for securing buttons. A small amount (less than 3/8 yard) of unbleached linen, 6.5 oz is required for pocket linings.

When making this roundabout of 12.5 oz. Russia sheeting between 1 5/8 to 1 7/8 yards is required. Linen roundabouts had pockets made of the same fabric as the coat and you should add a lining of between 1 5/8 to 1 7/8 yards unbleached linen, 6.5 oz.

Includes all sizes 1 [38], 2 [40], 3 [42] and 4 [44].

$30.00

Big and tall chest sizes 46+ to 54+.

$20.00

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