The sign of the unicorn. A fabric shop for 18th century reenactors and historians.

Women's Patterns

We offer several companies patterns. Each company has its own sizes available.

Shifts | Caps and Hose | Stays | Gowns | Outerwear

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Shifts

Kannik's Korner Woman's Shift second half of the 18th century KK 6102 is the best pattern for American Revolution historic reenactor and museum interpreter clthoing.

Kannik's Korner Woman's Shift
1750-1800

English Style Shift (Chemise) A full size pattern of this undermost garment, with stitching instructions, including whip gathered ruffle. This pattern is a composite of similar characteristics found in three original shifts now in museum collections, plus additional documentation. In The Pennsylvania Gazette of 1772 "Run away . . .  an indented servant woman . . .  had on, and took with her . . .  3 coarse shifts, one of which is a homespun, with a pair of fine sleeves, one ozenbrigs ditto, and one coarse tow ditto, with broken ruffles on the same" as cited in Wenches, Wives and Servant Girls.

Most shifts require about 2 1/2 yards for poor to middling sort 3.7 oz. oatmeal linen or off white 5.5 oz. linen shirting. Suggested shift fabric for middling to gentry off white 5.5 oz. linen shirting or white 3.7 oz. linen and 35/2 linen thread of either white or unbleached to match fabric.

Sizes per pattern, S-M-L-XL-XXL-XXXL.

$16.00

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Kannik's Korner Woman's Shift
1790-1820

A full size pattern of this undermost garment, useful for Empire and Federal style gowns, with a drawstring neckline to help adjust shift to gown neckline, and short sleeves to go with the fashion of the period. Based on original cutting directions, with construction techniques from several extant garments.

Most shifts require about 2 1/2 yards for poor to middling sort 3.7 oz. oatmeal linen or off white 5.5 oz. linen shirting. Suggested shift fabric for middling to gentry off white 5.5 oz. linen shirting or white 3.7 oz. linen and 35/2 linen thread of either white or unbleached to match fabric and one roll of 1/8" cotton twill tape.

Includes sizes S-M-L-XL-2XL-3XL.

$16.00

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Kannik's Korner Woman's Shift 1790 to 1820 KK 6103 is the best pattern for Fedrilist, Lewis and Clark era, and War of 1812 historic reenactor and museum interpreter clothing.
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Country Wives Two Chemises
1805-1807

This pattern includes cutting directions, instructions, and historical notes for two original shifts in the Vancouver Museum.

This chemise requires about 2 yards for poor to middling sort 3.7 oz. oatmeal linen or off white 5.5 oz. linen shirting. Suggested shift fabric for middling to gentry off white 5.5 oz. linen shirting or white 3.7 oz. linen and 35/2 linen thread of either white or unbleached to match fabric and one roll of 1/4" cotton twill tape.

Includes sizes S-M-L-XL.

$12.00

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Country Wives Two Chemises 1805 to 1807 is the best pattern for the early 19th century including Lewis and Clark era, and War of 1812 historic reenactor and museum interpreter clothing.
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Country Wives Clothing for a Country Born Woman includes suggestions to complete an outfit for a Metis woman from the early years of the 19th century.

Clothing for a Country Born Woman - early 19th Century

A Cold Weather Bed Gown Set

This is a complete starter set for a country woman from about 1800 to 1820. The package includes a full size pattern for a cold weather bedgown, leggings and the "Sally" cap from one of the earlier Country Wives patterns. Also included are diagrams for a short sleeved chemise, along with suggestions and notes to complete the outfit of a Metis woman. Instructions for a handkerchief, and draw string petticoat. The bedgown pattern is made from extant garments and artwork from the period which are all cited in the package.

One size short gown per pattern, including sizes small medium and large.

$24.00

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JP Ryan Basic Wardrobe pattern for second half of the 18th century historic reenactor and museum interpreter clthoing.

JP Ryan Basic Wardrobe

Contains pattern diagram for shift in all sizes, plus illustrated directions for petticoat, apron and neck handkerchief. Patterns included for short gown and pocket. In The Pennsylvania Packet of 1783 "Ran away . . .  an Irish servant Girl . . .  Had on and took with her, a green skirt, dark calicoe short gown, white stockings, leather shoes with low heels, two striped lincey petticoats, a striped red calicoe short gown" as cited in Wenches, Wives and Servant Girls.

One size short gown per pattern, bust sizes 32-34, 36-38, 40-42, 44,46, 48-50.

$18.00

Basic Six Piece Wardrobe

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Country Wives Settlement Series Clothing for an Indian Woman--early 19th Century.

Clothing for an Indian Woman-early 19th Century

This pattern comes complete with patterns for the clothing of an Aboriginal woman. Included are patterns for a strap dress, sleeves, leggings and a chemise/shirt. For Ojibwa or Cree there are notes and illustrations to complete your outfit. This pattern is well researched with a large list of citations.

Sizes per pattern, S-M-L.

$20.00

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La Fleur de Lyse Canadienne de la Nouvelle-France with Cap and Coif Pattern circa 1740-1760

This one pattern comes complete with everything a woman needs to begin attending French and Indian (1740 to 1760) era historical events including cap, gown, shift, petticoat, handkerchief, apron, and pocket. Besides shoes and stockings you will be set. A full pattern for the mantelet (known as a bedgown in English) is included with two sleeve versions. This shift pattern has a gathered sleeve more common for mid-century impressions opposed to the fitted sleeve which became popular in the 1770s. There are patterns for three styles of caps plus a long lappets cap and coif. Also included are cutting instructions for the petticoat, neck handkerchief and apron with two bib styles.

The mantelet requires 1 1/2 yards light-weight wool, linen, cotton print, and 1 1/2 yards, light-weight linen for a lining. Notions are 8 1/2 yards 1" cotton twill tape or 7/8" worsted twill tape in a coordinating color, and 35/2 or 50/3 linen thread.

The shift requires 2 1/2 yards white or unbleached linen.

The petticoat requires 2 yards light weight wool, linen, or cotton print, 5 1/2 yards 1" cotton or 7/8" worsted twill tape in a coordinating color, and 2 1/4 yards 1/2" cotton or linen tape.

The apron needs 1 1/4 yards linen and 1/4" cotton or linen tape.

The handkerchief requires only one yard of 2.8 oz. linen or organdy and fine 60/2 linen thread.

Suggested cap fabric 100% white handkerchief linen 2.8 oz, organdy, or for poorer caps off white 3.7 oz. linen

Suggested pocket fabrics 100% unbleached linen, 6.5 oz or 100% off white linen shirting, 5.5 oz.

$34.95

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La Fleur de Lyse Canadienne de la Nouvelle-France circa 1740-1760 pattern is the best shift, or in French chemise, pattern for French and Indian War historic re-enactor's and museum interpreter's clthoing.
La Fleur de Lyse Caps and Coif pattern is a good pattern for mid 18th century historic reenactor's and museum interpreter's clthoing.
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Caps and Hose

Bonnet

Kannik's Korner Woman's Caps and Bonnets KK 6603 works well for very late 18th century, Luis and Clark era, Napoleonic, and War of 1812 historic re-enactor's and museum interpreter's clothing.

Kannik's Korner Woman's Caps and Bonnets
for Fashionable and Working Women c. 1790 - 1820

Altogether this pattern provides 16 bonnet variations and two day cap patterns on full size tissue paper. The caps are based on originals whereas the bonnets are inspired by originals and numerous contemporary illustrations. One border pattern for View A and three border patterns for View A are printed on the tissue paper. This Kannik's pattern comes with a twenty page booklet which includes documentation, and extensive easy to follow directions. Embroidery tips, hand sewing stitches, and some special techniques are included as well.

One third to two third yards of 45" wide cotton organdy is rezuired for the cap. Notions for the cap include 1/8" white cotton twill tape and 60/2 white linen thread or non-mercerized cotton thread and white embroidery floss.

The bonnet requires about 2/3 yd. medium weight silk taffeta, velvet or silk satin in black, white, cream, green, blue, drab, tan, grey, changeble taffetas, or any other fashionable colors of the period. Notions for the bonnet include 3/4 yd. of 1/4" or 3/8" wide grosgrain ribbon, about 10 to 20" of pasteboard (now often called chipboard) and both heavy 16/2 linen thread or non-mercerized cotton and medium 35/2 linen thread or non-mercerized cotton.

$16.00

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Country Wives
Workwoman's Outdoor Bonnet c. 1789 - 1818

These bonnets were commonly worn by Western European (British, French) and North American women of laboring to middling classes. These were often worn by older women and usually over a day cap. This pattern includes suggestions for fabrics, documentation, and options in the construction. In The Proceedings of the Old Bailey, London of 1812 during the trial it was recorded, "though she had a large bonnet on at the time".

These bonnets require between 1/2 to 1 yard of linen or light weight wool (black wool was common but other dark colors were used as well). Matching 35/2 or 50/3 linen thread, bonnet board, buckram, or brim stiffening, and a narrow cotton twill tape to gather nape is also required. Finally ribbon for ties in matching or contrasting material is required.

$15.00

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Country Wives Workwoman's Outdoor Bonnet is good for federalist, new republic, Napoleonic, Lewis and Clark, and War of 1812 historic reenactor's and museum interpreter's clothing.
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Kannik's Korner Woman's Cap and Bonnet KK 6601 works well for mid to late 18th century historic re-enactor's and museum interpreter's clothing.

Kannik's Korner Woman's Cap and Bonnet

Based on original 18th century directions, this pattern is appropriate for 1775 to 1800 although similar cap and bonnets were used earlier. In some cases bonnets outnumber hats such as in New Jersey runaway descriptions. One from 1776 includes a servant woman who left with "a black silk bonnet."

A half yard of 2.8 oz. linen is enough for two caps. Notions for the cap include 1/8" white cotton twill tape and 60/2 white linen thread.

The bonnet requires about 2/3 yd. worsted wool or black brown, green, blue, or drab. Notions for the bonnet include 3/4 yd. of 1/4" wide grosgrain ribbon, and both heavy 16/2 linen thread and medium 35/2 linen thread.

$12.00

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Kannik's Korner
Women's/Men's Stockings, Women's Pockets, and Mitts

A full scale, multi-size, pattern for constructed stockings for men or women, with instructions for custom fitting. Can be made of knitted cloth, or of linen cut on the bias (good for 17th, 18th, early 19th century). Five pocket styles, including three mid-18th century (English, Scotch, & Italian), and two second half 18th century from America. Also includes a pattern for women's common linen mitts, cut on the bias (one size). In The Pennsylvania Packet of 1779 "Ran away . . .  a servant woman . . .  She stole and carried off . . .  one pair of white cotton mitts" as cited in Wenches, Wives and Servant Girls.

Includes stocking sizes S-M-L-XL-2X-3X Pattern

$14.00

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Kannik's Korner Stockings, Pockets, and Mitts KK 6001 works well for mid to late 18th century historic reenactor's and museum interpreter's clthoing.
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Larkin and Smith's A Pattern for 18th Century Silk Hats c. 1750s - 1780s. A Genteel Collection of the Most Fashionable Styles.

Larkin and Smioth
Silk Hats 1750s to 1780s

newThis pattern fills a void for a very common accessory.

This pattern will allow you to make a silk covered hat and includes 3 sizes and four different styles. The step by step instructions guide you with color photographs and illustrations. All techniques used are based on original 18th century hats from museum collections in both America and England. Hat styles and decorations are directly taken from period portraits and prints. This is a project even a newcomer to hand sewing can easily accomplish. A documentation card is included with each pattern. Many of these silk hats are described in runaway ads for example cited in Wenches, Wives and Servant Girls a newspaper ad in the 1775 Pennsylvania Gazette included "Run away . . .  a native Irish servant girl . . .  had on and took with her, a chip hat covered with black silk".

Only a half yard of black silk taffeta or other taffeta or satin and a straw hat is required. Black fine silk thread will make invisible stitches.

$18.00

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Mill Farm
18th Century Woman's Flounces and Mitts

This includes a full scale pattern for adding one of two styles of whitework embroidery single or double elbow flounces to the sleeves of a gown and making elbow length fingerless mitts with a pattern for embroidery. In The Proceedings of the Old Bailey, London of 1783 "BENJAMIN WILLIAMS was indicted for feloniously stealing . . .  one muslin flounce, value 8 s."

The flounces require 5/8 yd. of 2.8 oz. linen or cotton organdy. Notions for the flounces include 1/2" or 3/4" white cotton twill tape, white cotton or silk embroidery thread, and 60/2 white linen thread.

The mitts require about 1/2 yd. of 2.8 oz. linen, cotton organdy, or light weight wool. The only notions are a 40" fine cord or heavy thread such as #8 perle cotton sewing thread.

$8.00

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Mill Farm Flounces and Mitts works well for mid to late 18th century historic reenactor's and museum interpreter's clthoing.
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Kannik's Korner Woman's Night Cap c. 1790-1830 pattern.A picture of the finished night cap displayed in our shop.

Kannik's Korner
Woman's Night Cap 1790 to 1830

newA warm night cap for cold evenings.

This Night Cap is intended to be worn in bed and for warmth (not a day cap). It is soft comfortable and elegant; very useful in a time before central heating. Inspired by instructions given in “The Lady’s Economical Assistant”, by a Lady, first printed in 1808 with further documentation from similar original night caps. Construction techniques are based on the minimal information included in the primary source and supplemented with typical construction used in original caps.

The night cap is made with a double layer front head piece for warmth. Options include ruffles on the ends of the bands and tapered or square ends to the front ruffles. It can be worn with the bands hanging loose, tied in a bow, or comfortably wrapped around the neck.

One thing you can count on with Kannik’s Korner are their simple and detailed illustrations. Hand sewing instructions also with simple and clear pictures are always given in their patterns. However, if you need a night cap solely for cold events, or winter emergencies, and don't care about authenticity in sewing, one can be made fairly quickly on machine if you have a rolled hem attachment. Modern machine method steps are also provided for this purpose. This cap pattern is in one size only, based on original information, but can be easily altered per instructions. The pattern is on tissue paper.

Seven eights of a yard of organdy, 2.8 oz. linen or for poorer impressions white 3.7 oz. linen is required. White 1/8 inch cotton twill tape and 60/2 linen thread. Finally, there is an option for adding 2 1/2 yards of Torchon lace to the ruffles.

$12.00

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Kannik's Korner Woman's and Girl's Caps

This pattern includes many styles of everyday headgear used from 1740-1820. Often women try several styles before settling with one that works well for them. In The Pennsylvania Gazette of 1770 "Run away . . .  an Irish servant girl . . .  wears sometimes ribbons, and sometimes caps . . .  had on, and took with her . . .  two caps for a child, and linen to make more" as cited in Wenches, Wives and Servant Girls.

One yard of organdy, 2.8 oz. linen or for poorer impressions off white 3.7 oz. linen is plenty for most caps. Most styles require 1/8" white cotton twill tape and 60/2 linen thread.

$16.00

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Kannik's Korner Woman's and Girl's Caps 1740-1820 Everyday Headwear KK 6602 is great for 18th and 19th century historic re-enactor's and museum interpreter's costume.
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Country Wives Caps for the Upper Crust is a good pattern for early republic or fedrilist period historic re-enactor's and museum interpreter's clthoing.

Country Wives
Caps for the Upper Crust 1790 to 1820

These cap patterns were all created by studying art work of wealthy women in the United States and United Kingdom as well as extant caps from many museums. These caps are more complicated to construct, use several styles and widths of lace, and are more time consuming than many other cap patterns. In The Pennsylvania Gazette of 1773 "FRANCES MOLTON CRANMER was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering . . .  stealing therein . . .  two double lace caps, value 15s. a dress lace cap, value 10s.".

$16.00

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18th Century Wired Cap

Worn mostly by the middling to gentry classes but is seen in portraits on 'my lady's maids'. This cap was worn as early as 1745 but is most commonly seen from the late 1760s to early 1770s. Required milliner wire is included in the pattern. In The Providence Gazette of 1763 "RAN away . . .  a likely lusty Mulatto Servant Woman . . .  She is extremely nice in her Head Attire, which is generally ornamented after the modern Fashion".

To make this cap you will need 2/3 yard of 36-40" wide or 1/2 yard of 54-60" very fine white linen or organdy and fine 60/2 linen thread. There is an option to add trimmings such as narrow silk ribbon bows to 1 to 1 1/2" wide silk trimmings.

$8.00

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Cap pattern for those women of fortune for French and Indian War historic re-enactor's and museum interpreter's clothing.
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JP Ryan Caps pattern is a good pattern for mid to late 18th century historic re-enactor's and museum interpreter's clthoing.

JP Ryan Caps

A simple cap to cover the head, which can be worn with the ears turned toward or away from the face, as desired. An undress cap to be constructed in mid-weight white linen. In The Pennsylvania Gazette of 1773 "Run away . . .  a Dutch servant girl . . .  had on, when she went away, a round ear'd cap" as cited in Wenches, Wives and Servant Girls.

$7.00

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Woman's Caps 1720 to 1800

Women often try several caps before they find one that compliments their face and they feel comfortable wearing. This pattern provides four different styles that may be further adorned with ribbons to provide individual touches. In The Pennsylvania Gazette of 1773 "Run Away . . .  a Dutch servant woman . . .  had on an English cap, with a coarse lawn border" as cited in Wenches, Wives and Servant Girls.

For most of these caps you will need 1/2 to 3/4 yard of very fine white linen or organdy, 1/8" cotton twill tape, and fine 60/2 linen thread. There is an option to add trimmings such as narrow silk ribbon bows.

$9.00

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Cap pattern for French and Indian War, Revolutionary War, and early republic historic re-enactor's and museum interpreter's clothing.
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Country Wives pattern is a good pattern for early 19th century historic re-enactor's and museum interpreter's clthoing.

Country Wives

A Variety of Lappet Caps mid 18th to early 19th Centuries

Country Wives lappet caps were commonly worn by the French in both Europe and North America and were often worn by country women, farmers, maids, and genteel ladies. This pattern includes suggestions for fabrics, documentation, and options in the construction. In The Proceedings of the Old Bailey in London of 1781 the trial recorded, "The prisoner, Elizabeth Tenant, gave me a piece of lace lappet for a cap, and a cap caul".

$15.00

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Country Wives
Caps for the Working Poor Mid 18th to Mid 19th Century

All of these patterns are based on originals in museum collections made of sturdy linen. They may be made for wealthier impressions by making them of finer fabrics. The full pattern, directions, and documentation come in this pattern. In The Virginia Gazette of 1774, "RUN away from Forceput two convict servant women . . .  she took with her . . .  linen and muslin caps" as cited in Wenches, Wives and Servant Girls.

$15.00

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Cap pattern for French and Indian War, Revolutionary War, and early republic historic re-enactor's and museum interpreter's clothing.
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Country Wives pattern is a good pattern for early 19th century historic re-enactor's and museum interpreter's clthoing.

Country Wives
British Regency Caps 1780 to 1820

View A, B, & D are seen very frequently from the late 18th to early 19th century by laboring to middling sort women. View E is a cap worn by working class women shown in many of Pyne's British sketches. View C is an unusual example of a naive American young woman of about 1810. These styles of caps often were adorned with silk ribbons in bright pastel colors in widths from medium to quiet wide.

$15.00

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Country Wives
Beribboned Caps 1780 to 1810

This includes a selection of the overly large caps popular at the end of the 18th century. These caps are decorated with extravagant silk ribbons and includes instructions how to make a variety of ribbon rosettes. In The Proceedings of the Old Bailey, London, in 1791 "the prisoner robbed me of all my clothes . . .  she had my cap and ribbon on".

The largest of these caps requires less than 1 2/3 yards of either very fine white linen or will make up very well and hold their shape using cotton organdy. Fine 60/2 white linen thread works very well on these fine fabrics. To add rosettes to the caps 2 3/4 yards of 1 1/2" wide silk ribbon is required and fine 80/3 linen thread to match.

$16.00

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Cap pattern for early republic and fedrilist period historic re-enactor's and museum interpreter's clothing.
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Larkin and Smith's A Pattern for 18th Century Bonnet c. 1760s to 1770s Plain or Fancy Constructed in a Period Manner.

Larkin and Smith
Bonnet c. 1760s to 1770s

newA new pattern for a very common accessory.

This easy to follow pattern gives clear instructions that will walk you thru forming the bonnet brim and then assembling you’re your 1770s era bonnet. Suggestions for trimming and instructions on making trim are also included. By far, the most common fabric bonnets were made of during this period was black silk but blue, white (either linen or silk), green and brown silk and sometimes worsted are also found in runaway ad descriptions. A documentation card is included with each pattern. Many of these bonnets are described in runaway ads for example cited in Wenches, Wives and Servant Girls a newspaper ad in the 1778 Pennsylvania Evening Post included "Ran away . . .  an apprentice girl . . .  of Irish extraction: Had on when she went away, a black silk bonnet with white silk lining".

In addition to the pasteboard, only 1/3 yard of black silk taffeta or other silk is required to make this cap. Black (or other color to match) fine silk thread will create invisible stitches and 1 yard of 3/8 inch wide silk ribbon is required.

$15.00

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Stays

JP Ryan 18th Century Half boned Stays

Stays in the 18th century were worn to reshape the upper body. High fashion stays with shoulder straps were designed to create a fairly straight line from the bosom to the navel. Stays were the basic foundation garment upon which all subsequent garments were built. In The Virginia Gazette of 1774 "Run away . . .  a Welsh woman . . .  had on, and took with her . . .  an old pair of green coloured stays" as cited in Wenches, Wives and Servant Girls.

Comes in sizes 8–22.

The fabrics suggested here are for a working class pair of stays made in America during the 18th century. Our suggestions slightly differ from that of the pattern based on our own observations of extant stays and discussions with Hallie Larkin. This pattern calls for 2 pieces of 1 yard 60" wide sturdy linen one for the outside and another for the interfacing. Most commonly linen stays were made of unbleached, brown dyed, cinnamon and blue for example 6.5 or 8.2 oz. unbleached linen or 6.5 dyed brown linen. Worsted wool was also common for stays especially satin weave yellow, blue, green, lavender, white and eggplant with green and white being most common. One more 3/4 yard piece is required for the lining. Commonly the lining was made of a lightweight blue and white check linen but a simple 3.7 oz. oatmeal linen or 3.7 oz. off white linen was also somewhat common. For basic hand sewing and the channels use 35/2 off white linen thread and quilter's thread or buttonhole twist for sewing eyelets. One roll of 1/4" white or natural cotton twill tape will be enough or at least 4 yards of 1/4" linen tape for the back lacing. One coil of caning is enough for two pairs of stays. You may want 2 metal stays for center front but a busk does the job nicely. Usually the top and bottom of stays are bound with about 7 yards of 1/2" wide kid leather. You can use chamois leather (available from automotive supply since it is used for drying cars but get a natural color) since it is much less expensive. Some original stays are bound with 3/4" linen tape.

$18.00

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J.P. Ryan Half Boned Stays pattern is a great sewing pattern for late 18th century historic re-enactor's and museum interpreter's clthoing.
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JP Ryan Stays pattern is the best, for pattern for French and Indian War, 1770s, and American War for Indipendance historic re-enactor's and museum interpreter's clthoing.

Stays by JP Ryan

Strapless stays are designed for comfort and give a cylindrical shape to the torso while allowing full freedom of movement of the arms and shoulders. The fully illustrated directions are included for any necessary alterations required to fit your figure. These stays are appropriate for late 18th century wear and incorporates features from extant 18th century stays in the National Museum of American History and the Los Angeles County Museum of Art. In The Virginia Gazette of 1774 "Run away . . .  a Welsh woman . . .  had on, and took with her . . .  an old pair of green coloured stays" as cited in Wenches, Wives and Servant Girls.

Comes in sizes 6 through 24 for bust sizes 32-50.

The fabrics suggested here are for a working class pair of stays made in America during the 18th century. Our suggestions slightly differ from that of the pattern based on our own observations of extant stays and discussions with Hallie Larkin. This pattern calls for 2 pieces of 3/4 yard 60" wide sturdy linen one for the outside and another for the interfacing. Most commonly linen stays were made of unbleached, brown dyed, cinnamon and blue for example 6.5 or 8.2 oz. unbleached linen or 6.5 dyed brown linen. Worsted wool was also common for stays especially satin weave yellow, blue, green, lavender, white and eggplant with green and white being most common. One more 3/4 yard piece is required for the lining. Commonly the lining was made of a lightweight blue and white check linen but a simple 3.7 oz. oatmeal linen or 3.7 oz. off white linen was also somewhat common. For basic hand sewing and the channels use 35/2 off white linen thread and quilter's thread or buttonhole twist for sewing eyelets. One roll of 1/4" white or natural cotton twill tape will be enough or at least 4 yards of 1/4" linen tape for the back lacing. One coil of caning is enough for two pairs of stays. You may want up to 12 metal stays for extra strength in some places (but using a busk in the front will stop the front stays from breaking). Usually the top and bottom of stays are bound with about 7 yards of 1/2" wide kid leather. You can use chamois leather (available from automotive supply since it is used for drying cars but get a natural color) since it is much less expensive. Some original stays are bound with 3/4" linen tape.

$15.00

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Mill Farm 18th Century Jumps or Leather Stays

Jumps include options for a front and or back laced, lightly boned undergarment that is perfect for work, undress, or a first pair of stays. Leather stays were worn by poor women. In The Pennsylvania Packet of 1776 "Ran away . . .  an English servant girl . . .  had on and took with her . . .  a pair of leather stays" as cited in Wenches, Wives and Servant Girls.

Comes in sizes 8–18.

$8.00

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Mill Farm 18th Century Jumps or Leather Stays pattern is the best jumps pattern for late 18th century historic re-enactor's and museum interpreter's clthoing.
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Past Pattern stays pattern is the best pattern for Lewis and Clark era, Nepolianic and War of 1812 historic reenactor's and museum interpreter's clthoing.

A Partially Boned Transition Stay Circa 1793-1820

These stays are comfortable, cool on hot summer days, and supportive. The full size pattern is based on an original in the Connecticut Historical Society stay number 1963-42-4. The pattern contains background notes reviewing differences among 18th through the early 20th century stays and corsets, show detailed drawings of transition stays in museum and private collections, and contemporary documentation dating the Connecticut Historical Society stay. These garments were in addition to the stiff and inflexible, waist-compressing item that many people imagine when the word corset is mentioned today. Fully illustrated fitting and construction instructions are included in this pattern. In The Proceedings of the Old Bailey in London of 1811 it was recorded "I keep a pawnbrokers shop . . .  the prisoner came to my shop, she looked at some stays that were hanging up in the shop, she asked me if I thought they would fit her, I told her that I had half a dozen more pair in doors, I had no doubt I could fit her, I shewed her some more, she tried one two or three pair and then selected one, for which she was to pay me five shillings".

Each pattern inclueds sizes 8 through 26 for bust sizes 31-1/2-48.

$17.00

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A Pair of Transition Stays Circa 1796-1806

This pattern was pulled, with permission, from the extant garment in the Danvers' Historical Society in Danvers, Massachusetts. The threads appear to be hand spun and the fabric appears to be hand woven of linen warp and cotton weft. The thread count is approximately 40 warp and 36 weft. The pieces are sewn together with linen thread, perhaps the thread used to weave the fabric. The stiffening is whalebone. While the front is fully-boned the back and sides are partially boned. Variations of the front boning from Conner Prairie Museum in Fishers, Indiana and The Chester County Historical Society in West Chester, Pennsylvania are included with the pattern.

Detailed Historical Notes explaining and documenting what is unique about a pair of transition stays are included in the pattern package. For example in The Proceedings of the Old Bailey in London of 1802 it was recorded "she pulled off her stays, and in the lefthand side of the back part of the stays, I found the note.".

The pattern comes in sizes 8-14, 16-20, and 22-26 all with cup sizes B, C, and D. The following sizes are layout out on 45" wide fabric. Sizes 8 through 14 require 1/2 yd. fashion fabric and 2/3 yd. lining, sizes 16 through 20 require 3/4 yd. fashion fabric and 7/8 yd. lining and sizes 22 through 26 require 7/8 yd. of fashion fabric and 1 yd. of lining.

$11.00

Metal Bands:

Past Patterns sells the set of metal bands that are inserted in the horizontal breast-bone casings that make a transition stays unique.

$3.00 a pair.

The stay is worn with Past Patterns Ca 1796-1806 Lewis & Clark Era Front Closing Gown (below).

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Stay pattern for Sandra Altmen's transitional, late 18th early 19th century stays for historic reenactors and museum interpreters.
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Gowns

JP Ryan Robe à l'Anglaise Pattern for mid to late 18th century historic reenactor's and museum interpreter's costume. French and Indian War and American Revolution saw this type of gown in use.

JP Ryan
Robe à l'Anglaise
or English Nightgown

1750-1780 May be constructed in a variety of ways. The two views shown offer a Robe à l'Anglaise en foureau as round gown with an apron front or as a Robe à l'Anglaise à La Polonnaise as an open robe with petticoat. Either view may be made as an open or closed robe. The most versatile gown of the 18th century! In The Virginia Gazette of 1774, "Run away . . .  two convict servant women . . .  [one of them] has on a new pompadour gown . . .  she took with her an old green gown" as cited in Wenches, Wives and Servant Girls.

For gown view A 4 1/2 yards or view B 5 1/2 yards (more may be needed when using stripes or prints) linen, heavy silk, printed cotton or medium weight wool, 1 yard, light weight linen for a lining. Notions required are hook and eyes or hook and eye tape, plastic feather boning, 35/2 or 50/3 linen thread and view A only requires 2 yards of 3/4" silk ribbon and 2 button molds 1/2" diameter. View B requires 1/2" twill tape for apron ties.

View A petticoat requires 2 1/2 yards (more may be needed when using stripes or prints) linen, heavy silk, printed cotton or medium weight wool, 2 1/2 yards 1" twill tape or 7/8" twill tape in a coordinating color, and 35/2 or 50/3 linen thread.

Available in sizes 8-22, one size per pattern.

$18.00

Robe à l'Anglaise

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Larkin and Smith nightgown pattern for mid to late 18th century historic reenactor's and museum interpreter's costume. Larkin and Smith nightgown pattern for mid to late 18th century historic reenactor's and museum interpreter's costume made of our chintz fabric.

Larkin and Smith
English Gown c. 1760-1770

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Please use your bust measurement in stays when ordering.

A gown even a beginner can make, experience is not a requirement! This full size pattern provides 34 pages of step by step instructions, with 20 pages of color photographs, spiral bound with variations for middling and working class gowns. The back pleating is essential to making a proper gown. Because of this, a template has been include so that anyone can get the pleating looking good right out of the packet.

The gown, often referred to as "en fourreau", although also known as "night gown" as late as 1774 was more often than not just called "gown" by the English. For example The Pennsylvania Packet of 1773, "Ran away . . .  an Irish servant girl . . .  She stole and took with her, one calico gown of a shell figure" as cited in Wenches, Wives and Servant Girls.

This gown style was in use for more than 50 years. The reason? The open front style adapts to up to a 20 pound weight change, more easily than any other style of 18th century gown. This was very important in pre-industrial revolution time period when materials were so expensive.

After visiting many museums across the US and England, Larkin and Smith have been giving gown and stay workshops for over 12 years. This gown pattern is developed from these years of examining extant gowns and practical fitting of gowns on modern bodies. Urging from students who were unable to attend full classes or travel the distances resulted in this accurately constructed open front English Gown. Like mother like daughter--try the Larkin and Smith Girl's Gown Pattern.

The gown requires 4 yards of 54-60" wide fabric or 6 yards of 45" wide fabric (more may be needed when using stripes or prints) linen, heavy silk, printed cotton or medium weight wool, 1 yard, light weight linen for a lining. Notions required are 35/2 or 50/3 linen thread. For the petticoat 2 to 2 1/5 yards of 54 to 60" wide fabric or 4 yards of 45" wide fabric is required.

Pattern fits
Bust 34-35 and Waist 28-29
Bust 36-37 and Waist 30-31
Bust 38-39 and Waist 32-33
Bust 41-43 and Waist 34-35
Bust 45-47 and Waist 37-39
Bust 49-51 and Waist 41-43

$28.00

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Fig Leaf Open Robe Pattern for 18th century historic reenactor's and museum interpreter's costume.

Fig Leaf Patterns
Open Robe ca. 1771

This pattern includes a full packet of information with well documented directions for both open and closed robe gown with petticoat. In The Pennsylvania Gazette of 1772, "Run away . . .  an Irish servant girl . . .  had on when she went away, a long old green worsted gown" as cited in Wenches, Wives and Servant Girls.

To make this gown you will need about 4 yards (extra yardage is required if stripes or patterns are being used) of linen, heavy silk, cotton print, or light weight wool fabric for the gown and one yard of light weight linen for a lining. A petticoat will require an additional 2 yards of linen, heavy silk, cotton print or light weight wool. Notions required are one spool of 80/3 or 60/2 linen thread, and hook and eyes long enough to close the front of the gown. Three yards of one inch cotton twill tape is required for the closed robe option.

Only available in sizes 18R-28R (pattern fits 41" - 51" bust)

$25.00

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Country Wives Pattern
Clothing for a Working Class Woman A Dress Set
1810 to 1820

This includes a full size pattern for the dress with cutting directions for a full outfit of cap, chemise, apron, and pocket. The shift pattern is exactly the same as the Country Wives Two Chemises 1805-1807. Clear instructions, suggested fabrics and historical notes are provided with understandable illustrations. In The Proceedings of the Old Bailey, London of 1807, "ANN COOPER was indicted for feloniously stealing . . .  a cotton gown, value 15 s."

To make this gown you will need about 3 yards (extra yardage is required for larger sizes or if stripes or patterns are being used) of plain weave linen, one color cotton print, or worsted or flannel (medium or dark shades of blue, grey, brown or gold are suggested). The lining is optional and will require 1/3 yard of light weight linen or cotton. Notions required are a spool of 35/2 linen thread, and 1/4" to 3/8" cotton twill tape.

XS, S and M
M, L, and XL

$30.00

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Country Wives Clothing for a Working Class Woman is for early 19th century historic reenactor's and museum interpreter's clothing.
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Country Wives Half Gown with Strap Skirt and Long Gown c. 1800.

Two Strapped High-Waisted
Upper Petticoats c. 1798-1825

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This pattern provides a full size pattern, clear pictures illustrating construction and the stitches used to make an upper high-waisted petticoat. The high-waisted or empire style short gown, spencer or jacket were worn on the top of the body, under these was an outer petticoat (similar to the modern skirt) that could be seen and the under-petticoat (similar to the modern slip). Because of the high waist fashionable from about 1790 to 1820 straps had to be used to hold these petticoats in place. This pattern is coppied with permission from an original at the Genesee Country Village and Museum in Mumford, New York but extensive documentation from both Europe and America are used to justify the use of this garment over a wide area. Additional pictures and descriptions further document what fabrics both the upper and under petticoats were made of. An additional excerpt from Susan Green further explains fabrics that can be used to make the petticoat.

$17.00

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Fig Leaf Patterns
Work Dress ca. 1795

Empire gown of the transitional style with a higher waistline. The bodice front neckline is low and curved. The bodice also ends high under the bust and has three darts on each side for shaping and extends around the body as in the earlier" en fourreau" style. The shoulder strap is constructed in the same manner as earlier styles and has two sets of patches. The sleeves are two-piece construction with a narrow hem. In The Providence Gazette of 1796, "Ran away . . .  a Negro WOMAN . . .  She stole and carried off . . .  a light Calicoe new Gown, a striped Tow and Linen Gown".

Required fabric is about 4 yards (extra yards may be required when using a stripe or print) of linen, cotton print, or light weight wool fabric. Notions required are 2 2/3 yards of 1/4" cotton tape, 2 3/4" hooks and 35/2 or 50/3 linen thread.

Only available in sizes 18R-28R (pattern fits 41" - 51" bust)

$25.00

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Fig Leaf Work Dress for late 18th century historic reenactor's and museum interpreter's clothing.
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Country Wives The Sooke Dress: A Regncy Dress of the middling Sort c. 1800.

Country Wives
The Sooke Dress
A Regncy Dress of the middling Sort c. 1800

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The Sooke Dress is currently owned by the Sooke Region Museum, Vancouver Island, British Columbia and is an afternoon or walking dress. Although the dress is stylish it is made of an English two color cotton print with somwhat rough texture. The pattern provides options to make the dress as the original is constructed or in an easier way.

To make the walking dress you will need about 5 1/4 yards (extra yardage is required if stripes or patterns are being used) of plain or one or two color cotton print. The lining requires 1 1/6 yards of light weight linen or cotton. Notions required are a spool of 35/2 linen thread, 3/8" to 1/2" cotton twill tape 2 medium hooks and eyes and 2 or 3 small hooks and eyes.

Sizes S, M, and L

$24.00

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Country Wives Settlement Series Clothing for a Working Woman - early 19th Century A Bed Gown Set.

Country Wives
Settlement Series
Clothing for a Working Woman - early 19th Century
A Bed Gown Set

This is a complete starter set for a settler from about the 1790s to 1814. The package includes full size patterns for an English bedgown, a working woman's cap taken from their Caps for the Working Poor pattern, and a pocket. Also included are diagrams for a short sleeved chemise, instructions for a handkerchief, apron and petticoat plus suggestions and notes to complete the outfit of a settler of the early years of the 19th century. The bedgown pattern is made from extant garments and artwork from the period which are all cited in the package.

To make the bed gown you will need about 2 1/4 yards (extra yardage is required if stripes or patterns are being used) of plain weave linen (narrow stripe linens were common), one or two color cotton print, light weight worsted wool or wool flannel of either a solid color or striped. The lining requires 2 1/4 yards of light weight linen or cotton. Notions required are a spool of 35/2 linen thread, and 3/8" to 1/2" cotton twill tape.

Sizes S, M, L and XL

$24.00

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JP Ryan
Pet-en-l'air

The pet-en-l'air has a fitted torso without front waist seam, and a pleated sack back that extends from neckline to hem. Designed to be worn over stays, the Pet-en-l'air was popular from the 1750s to the 1770s.

Available in sizes 6-8 through 22-24.

$20.00

Pet-en-l'air (Robe à la Française)

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JP Ryan Pet-en-l'air Pattern for mid to late 18th century historic reenactor's and museum interpreter's costume.
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Woman's Gown A Robe Polonaise ca. 1770 to 1785

This pattern may be used to make a simple day gown with the option to wear it 'a la polonaise' or tucked up at the hips. Included are directions for the petticoat and hip pads. In The Pennsylvania Gazette of 1771, "Run away . . .  living in Philadelphia . . .  a Welsh servant girl . . .  she had on, and took with her, when she went away, two calicoe gowns, one dark, the other a purple in diamonds, much worn" as cited in Wenches, Wives and Servant Girls.

This gown requires approximately 4 yards (extra yardage is required if stripes or patterns are being used) of linen (striped linens were common), heavy silk, cotton print, or light weight wool fabric for the gown, 3/4 yard of light weight linen for the bodice lining, 1/2 yard linen or Persian silk for the sleeve lining. A petticoat will require an additional 2 yards of linen, heavy silk, cotton print (to match the gown), or light weight wool. Notions required are one spool of 80/3 or 60/2 linen thread, 10 large hook and eyes, 3 1/2 yards of half inch cotton twill or linen tape, 2 yards one inch cotton twill tape, 2 yards 1/4" silk ribbon to match robe, 2 tiny (1/2") buttons, 1 yard plain linen for hip pads, and stuffing material.

$12.00

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Cap pattern for French and Indian War, Revolutionary War, and early republic historic re-enactor's and museum interpreter's clothing.
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JP Ryan
Ca. 1770-1785
Caraco

Long jacket which may be worn down or up à la Polonaise, with optional ruching strip to be attached across center front to hold handkerchief in place. Available in sizes 6 through 20, two sizes per pattern. Includes sleeve ruffles and petticoat. In The Pennsylvania Gazette of 1775, "Run away . . .  an Irish servant maid . . .  took with her . . .  a small red striped long gown, with black spots between the stripes, mended under the arms with another sort of calico" as cited in Wenches, Wives and Servant Girls.

Sizes 32-24, 36-38, 40-42, 44-46

$18.00

Caraco

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JP Ryan Caraco Pattern for mid to late 18th century historic reenactor's and museum interpreter's costume. American Revolution saw this type of gown in use.
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Mill Farm Riding Habit Pattern for mid to late 18th century historic reenactor's and museum interpreter's costume. French and Indian War and American Revolution saw this type of riding habit in use.

Mill Farm
Woman's Riding Habit Jacket and Waistcoat Pattern

This c. 1740-1780 riding habit was first used for active sport but increasingly became fashionable for traveling and informal outdoor leisurewear. This pattern includes a complete pattern for the jacket and waistcoat with instructions for the petticoat. In The Pennsylvania Gazette of 1776, "Run away . . .  two Irish servant women, . . .  had on, and took with them, one camblet riding habit, faced with blue peelong" as cited in Wenches, Wives and Servant Girls.

The jacket and waistcoat require 3 1/2 yards medium weight wool, 3 1/2 yards, light weight linen for a lining, 1/2 yard linen buckram interfacing, 16 buttons or button molds 1"diameter, 10 buttons or button molds 3/4" diameter, and 35/2 or 50/3 linen thread. The petticoat requires 2 1/2 to 3 yards medium weight wool, 2 1/2 yards 1" twill tape or 7/8" twill tape in a coordinating color, and 35/2 or 50/3 linen thread.

Sizes 8-10, 12-14, 16-18

$15.00

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Fig Leaf Pattern's Lady's Jacket c. 1770-85 for historic reenactor's and museum interpreter's costume. American Revolution saw this type of jacket worn.

Fig Leaf Patterns
Lady's Jacket c. 1770-85

This practical garment is based on an original that may have been a man's waistcoat in the 1730s and remade into a woman's jacket in the 1770s with reenforcements added in the 1780s. This is an interesting full size pattern with complete directions and a description of the original. In The Virginia Gazette of 1771, "Run away . . .  a Negro Wench . . .  had on when she went away a black Yarn Serge Jacket" as cited in Wenches, Wives and Servant Girls.

Required is 1 yard but extra fabric may be required if stripes or prints are used. Fabric suggestions include linen, cotton print or light weight wool. One yard of light weight linen for a lining and less than 1/4 yard cotton print or contrasting linen. Notions required are a spool of 35/2, 50/3, or 60/2 linen thread for hand sewing. Three and one third yards (or more) of 3/4" silk ribbon for a binding and 3 yards of 3/8" silk ribbon for ties or 3 to 5 sets of hook and eyes.

Sizes 18R-28R

$18.00

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JP Ryan Ladies Jacket Pattern for mid to late 18th century historic reenactor's and museum interpreter's costume. French and Indian War and American Revolution saw this type of gown in use.

JP Ryan
A Fine Collection of
18th Century Jackets
for undress wear

This very special pattern contains 10 pattern pieces which may be combined to create an entire wardrobe of 18th century jackets. Four views are given, each for a different time period. Because all the pattern pieces, i.e. sleeves, cuffs, backs and front, fit together, you may create additional styles, based on your research. In The Pennsylvania Gazette of 1770, "Run away . . .  a servant girl . . .  had on, and took with her, a linsey jacket, patched under the arms, with patches of a different colour" as cited in Wenches, Wives and Servant Girls.

Required are between 1 1/2 to 2 1/2 yards fabric based on style and size. Extra fabric may be required if stripes or prints are used. Fabric suggestions include linen, cotton print or light weight wool. The same amount of light weight linen for a lining and one yard of linen buckram interfacing will also be needed. Notions required are a spool of 35/2, 50/3, or 60/2 linen thread for hand sewing. Depending on the style 10 button molds, 3 yards of ribbon or 1/2 yard of twill tape may be required.

Sizes 6-8, 10-12, 14-16, 18-20, 22-24

$18.00

18th Century Jackets

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Past Patterns Ca 1796-1806
Lewis & Clark Era Front Closing Gown

This pattern was pulled, with permission, from the extant garment in the Wayne County Historical Museum in Richmond, Indiana. The threads are hand spun and the fabric is hand woven of linen warp and cotton weft. The background is white, interrupted every 7/8 inch by alternate threads of madder red and indigo blue. Unlike today's fabric, the stripes are at a right angle to the salvage. Pictured at left is the dress fabric.

Illustrated instructions for sewing the garment by hand are included; however, this is an easy garment to sew by machine.

The bodice is conservatively cut yet it has the fashionable small back of the period. As a result of the small back the sleeves form the shoulders, creating a very comfortable fit. Drawstrings fasten the center front closed at the neck and waist. The bodice is lined. The front lining is loose from the armholes to center front. It crosses over and fastens at center front with straight pins. This front lining does not support the bust. It is to help hold the front closed. A corset is worn with this garment.

The pleated skirt is fullest in the back and flat in the front. A 1-1/2 inch crescent-shaped tuck at center front raises the skirt over the toes.

Sizes 8-14, 16-20, 22-26 in B, C and D cups. Sizes 8 through 14 require 4-1/2 yds.; sizes 16 through 20 require 5 yds. and sizes 22 through 26 require 5-1/2 yds. of 45 inch wide fabric.
Multi-sized 8-14, 16-20, 22-26 in B, C and D cups.

$28.00

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Past Patterns Front Closing Gown Pattern for mid to late 18th century historic reenactor's and museum interpreter's costume. Lewis and Clark era saw this type of gown in use.
Original fabric swatch for this gown.
Dress Fabric
Original fabric swatch for lining the front of this Fedrilist or Lewis and Clark era gown.
Front Lining Fabric
Original fabric swatch for lining the back of this Fedrilist or Lewis and Clark era gown.
Back Lining Fabric
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Kannik's Korner Bed Gown Pattern KK 6501 for mid to late 18th century historic reenactor's and museum interpreter's costume. French and Indian War and American Revolution saw this type of gown in use.

Kannik's Korner Women's Bed Gown
1730-1770

Bed gowns were worn by working women and do not require stays for a good fit. In The Pennsylvania Gazette of 1776, "Ran Away . . .  a servant girl . . .  had on . . .  a blue and white calico bed gown with long sleeves, considerably broke" as cited in Wenches, Wives and Servant Girls.

To make a bed gown you will need between 2 3/4 to 3 1/4 yards (extra yards may be required when using a stripe or print) of linen, cotton print or light weight wool fabric. Linen or cotton print of 2 to 2 3/8 yards are required for a lining. Notions required are 2/3 to 3/4 yards of 1/2" cotton, linen, or grosgrain tape and 35/2 or 50/3 linen thread.

Includes sizes XS to XXXL.

$18.00

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Mill Farm Patterns Woman's European Bedgown for mid to late 18th century historic reenactor's and museum interpreter's costume. French and Indian War and American Revolution saw this type of gown in use.

Mill Farm European Bedgown
1730-1770

Bedgowns were worn by working women and do not require stays for a good fit. This pattern has an optional lining, several cuff types, and ties may be added to close the front. Complete directions for making a petticoat are also included. In The Pennsylvania Gazette of 1775, "Run away . . .  two Irish servants . . .  the woman . . .  had on . . .  a bedgown, striped blue, red, green and white" as cited in Wenches, Wives and Servant Girls.

Although this pattern is less expensive than the Kanniks Korner bed gown the directions are not as clear and there are no illustrations to follow. This pattern does not explain the documentation whereas the Kanniks pattern provides full citations.

Bedgowns require about 2 yards (extra yards may be required when using a stripe or print) of linen, cotton print or light weight wool fabric. For hand sewing you will need 35/2 or 50/3 linen thread. There is an option to add 6 buttons or button molds with a 1/2" diameter on the sleeves and a separate option to close the bedgown with 1 yard of narrow ribbon, cotton, or linen tape instead of a straight pin or your apron.

For the petticoat 2 to 2 1/2 yards of linen or light weight wool fabric will be needed. Notions required are 2 1/2 yards of 1" to 1 /2" wide wool, cotton, or linen tape in a coordinating color and 35/2 or 50/3 linen thread to match.

Sizes 8-10 and 12-18.

$10.00

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Outerwear

Cloak

Kannik's Korner Pattern KK 6901 for mid to late 18th century historic reenactor's and museum interpreter's costume. French and Indian War and American Revolution saw this type of gown in use.

Kannik's Korner Woman's Short Cloak

Short cloaks were commonly worn by women of all classes during the second half of the 18th century. Being very convenient for working women short cloaks stay closed while working whereas full length cloaks get in the way. This pattern may be easily lengthened which will require additional fabric and tape. In The Rhode Island Newport Mercury of 1773, "RAN away . . .  an indented Irish maid servant . . .  is supposed to have had on a red short cloak" as cited in Wenches, Wives and Servant Girls.

To make this short cloak you will need between 2 to 2 1/2 yards of wool fabric. Notions required are 2 3/4 yards of 5/8" or 1/2" worsted tape, 2 1/8 yards of 7/8" worsted tape and 35/2 or 50/3 linen thread usually the thread and tapes match the color of the cloak.

Includes all sizes S to XXL.

$14.00

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Mill Farm Long or Short Cloak Pattern

Diagram and instructions for making a long or short cloak 1750 to 1810 with either a large or small hood. In The Rhode Island Newport Mercury of 1774, "RAN away . . .  an apprentice GIRL . . .  had on . . .  a long brown cloak" as cited in Wenches, Wives and Servant Girls.

This pattern requires 5 yards of medium to heavy weight wool, 2 yards of linen buckram interfacing, 1 yard 7/8" worsted tape, and 50/3 linen thread. This pattern provides options for different closing methods. We feel the best option is to use 2 3/4 yards of 5/8" or 1/2" worsted tape to tie the cloak shut. To be sure it does not loosen, hooks and eyes may be added right where the cloak ties shut.

$3.00

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Mill Farm Long or Short Cloak Pattern for mid to late 18th century historic reenactor's and museum interpreter's costume. French and Indian War and American Revolution saw this type of gown in use.

Shifts | Caps and Hose | Stays | Gowns | Outerwear

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