The sign of the unicorn. A fabric shop for 18th century reenactors and historians.

Wools

Wool was the most common fabric in New England in the 18th century and used to make all garments because of its durability. It was not only used for warmth but, worsteds, due to their absorbency and ability to breathe, are cool when used in the summer. It accepts dyes easily and is available in many colors.

Bag Hose | Broadcloth | Worsted | Flannel | Bay | Jean Cloth/Virginia Cloth | Specialty Weaves

Specialty Weaves

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Wool drugget for 18th century, and early 19th century reenactors, nautical historians and museum interpreters.

Drugget, 100% wool, Cloth Colour'd, 50" wide, $22/yd.
WWN 149

Drugget was usually made without a wale or rib but sometimes had it. Drugget was used to make working class waistcoats, breeches, jackets and coats. Sometimes drugget was used to make women's waistcoats. For example advertised in The Virginia Gazette of 1739, "a Welchman . . .  steal out of the said Subscriber's House . . .  He had on a light colourd Cloth or Drugget Coat, with Metal Buttons". Off white or unmbleached linen thread 35/2 for hand sewing are slightly lighter or darker to this fabric beige 50/3 linen thread is closer in color. For sewing button holes you might try tan silk quilter's thread.

Add Drugget Cloth Colour'd with a Wale Cloth WWN 149 to Cart

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Bag Hose

Bag hose fabric was used to make both Scottish trews and hose as may be seen in this detail of the 1780 The Highland Wedding and this picture of a 1744 Highland soldier. Bag hose fabric may be purchased by the bolt at wholesale prices so please contact us. This is in a limited supply (this is a one time weaving of this hard to find fabric). Fulling should be done with care by an experienced person and at your own risk. When the fabric is fulled it will shrink to about 53" wide. It takes approximately 1 to 1 1/2 yards of bag hose fabric to make a pair of size 9 bag hose. Directions for well fitting bag hose may be found in the book Baghose: The construction of (diced or otherwise). Off white linen thread of 35/2 will work well for this fabric when hand sewing.

Bag Hose Fabric, 100% wool, 58" wide.
$54.00/yd.
Now only 42.00/yd.

Bag hose fabric for Scottish historic reenactors and museum interpreters.
WWH 100 scarlet red/white/black check
shown before (top) and after fulling (lower).


Add Diced Bag Hose WWH 100 to Cart

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Jean Cloth or Kersey Wove Virginia Cloth

Jean Cloth is strong twilled fabric used for Civil war men's trousers and jackets. In the twilling process the cotton lays toward the wrong side of the fabric keeping the wool toward the outside and away from the body. In the 18th century this fabric is one of many types of Virginia cloth which was a homespun fabric usually made of cotton and woolen fibers. Kersey is both a fabric and weave and in the case of Virginia cloth indicates a twill weave. Virginia cloth of kersey weave was used to make durable cheep men's outer garments like breeches, jackets, coats, and waistcoats. Not all Virginia cloth had a kersey weave to it there were many other types of Virginia cloth.

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Brown Jean Cloth, 76% wool 24% cotton, 22 oz., 56" wide, $24.00/yd.
WWW 828

In The Virginia Gazette of 1776, "RUN away . . .  a slim black fellow . . .  I know not what clothes he took with him; but if he has his new waistcoat and breeches, they were of Virginia wool and cotton cloth of kersey weaving." When hand sewing this fabric try 35/2 unbleached or cinnamon brown linen thread.

Add Jean Cloth Brown WWW 828 to Cart

Jeancloth fabric swatch for 18th and 19th century re-enactors, military historians, and museum interpreters.
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Oxford Jean Cloth, 76% wool 24% cotton, 22 oz., 56" wide, $24.00/yd.
WWW 829

In The Virginia Gazette of 1744 to 1745, "RUN away . . .  an Apprentice Lad . . .  being a Mustee . . .  Had on a Virginia Cloth Jacket, Kersey-wove, and the Sleeves plain". When hand sewing this fabric 35/2 unbleached linen thread works well.

Add Jean Cloth Oxford WWW 829 to Cart

Jeancloth fabric swatch for 18th and 19th century reenactors, military historians, and museum interpreters.
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Bag Hose | Broadcloth | Worsted | Flannel | Bay | Jean Cloth/Virginia Cloth | Specialty Weaves

 

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